RISK FACTORS FOR MEN

hpv-kling2ALAN KLING, M.D

Dr. Kling is a recognized expert in the field of HPV treatment, Dr. Kling has lectured on HPV at Columbia, Cornell, Mount Sinai, NYU, Yale and many other medical centers, as well as at numerous national meetings. He is up-to-date on the latest advances in the diagnosis and treatment of HPV. Dr. Kling is the recognized go-to-person for HPV-related diagnoses in the metropolitan NYC area.
Dr. Kling’s private practice offices are located on the Upper East Side in Manhattan and in Park Slope, Brooklyn. The offices are comfortable, stylish, elegantly decorated and impeccably clean. You can feel reassured that your consultation and treatment will be performed by an accomplished, experienced, and well-respected board-certified physician.

Q: What are risk factors for HPV infection in men?
A: The main factors that put a man at greater risk of acquiring an HPV infection are a history of multiple partners, lack of circumcision, lack of condom use, history of other sexual transmitted infections, smoking and exposure to second-hand smoke.

Q: What is the one factor that puts a man at greatest risk of having an HPV infection?
A: The most consistently reported risk factor HPV infection in men is a the lifetime number of sexual partners. The number of recent sexual partners is particularly important.

Q: What is the association between economic status and the chances of getting an HPV infection?
A: Men who are of a higher economic class have a decreased chance of getting an HPV infection.

Q: What are the protective factors against HPV infection in men?
A: Factors that are protective for a man against HPV infections include condom use, being circumcised, not smoking, not being exposure to second-hand smoke, and higher economic status.

Q: What is the association between HPV and tobacco?
A: Men who smoke have a higher chance of getting an HPV infection.

Q: What does the term persistence mean?
A: Persistence refers to HPV infections that do not resolve on its own. Most HPV infections do resolve on their own.

Q: Are there any particular conditions that increase a person’s chance of having persistent HPV infections?
A: Infection with high risk strains and multiple HPV types increase the chance of a person having a persistent infection.

Q: Are there any protective factors associated with not getting persistence?
A: Circumcision has a protective effect against HPV persistence.

Q: What are the protective factors that help minimize a person’s chances of getting an HPV infection?
A: Factors associated with a decreased chance of getting HPV infections include fewer number of sexual partners, condom use, the man being circumcised, being a non smoker, negative history of second-hand smoke exposure and higher socioeconomic status.

Q: What is the single factor that puts a man at the greatest risk for getting an HPV infection?
A: The man’s chances of getting an HPV infection are directly related to his lifetime number of sexual partners.