MALE HPV

hpv-kling2ALAN KLING, M.D

Dr. Kling is a recognized expert in the field of HPV treatment, Dr. Kling has lectured on HPV at Columbia, Cornell, Mount Sinai, NYU, Yale and many other medical centers, as well as at numerous national meetings. He is up-to-date on the latest advances in the diagnosis and treatment of HPV. Dr. Kling is the recognized go-to-person for HPV-related diagnoses in the metropolitan NYC area.
Dr. Kling’s private practice offices are located on the Upper East Side in Manhattan and in Park Slope, Brooklyn. The offices are comfortable, stylish, elegantly decorated and impeccably clean. You can feel reassured that your consultation and treatment will be performed by an accomplished, experienced, and well-respected board-certified physician.

Q: Is smoking a risk factor for getting an HPV in men?
A:
Smoking has been associated with persistence of HPV infections as well as with the development of cancers of the cervix, anus, rectum and in the oral cavity.

Q: What is the association between genital warts and smoking?
A:
There is a higher incidence of genital warts in men who smoke over 10 cigarettes/day.

Q: Men and his female partner’s chances of getting cervical cancer?
A:
A woman’ s chance of developing cervical cancer increases when her partner smokes.

Q: What is the effect of the passive inhalation of second hand smoke on a woman s chance of developing cervical cancer?
A:
Second-hand smoke increases the chances of a woman developing cervical cancer.

Q: What if the woman is herself a smoker?
A:
The passive inhalation of tobacco increases a woman’ s chances of developing cervical cancer, even after adjusting for the woman’ s own smoking history and other factors known to be associated with cervical cancer.

Q: How does smoking affect a woman’s chances of developing cervical cancer?
A:
Active smoking as well as second-hand smoke will increase a woman’ s chances of getting cervical cancer. The woman’ s chances of developing cervical cancer will decrease if her exposure to second hand smoke decrease, whether that second hand smoke exposure is from a partner or in a work or social environment.

Q: What happens to a woman’s chances of getting cervical cancer if she stops smoking?
A:
A woman’ s chances of getting cervical cancer as well as other HPV-related diseases will decrease after she stops smoking. The chances of developing cervical cancer will also go decrease if she minimizes or eliminates her exposure to second-hand smoke.

Q: Does smoking increase a woman’s chances of getting an HPV infection?
A:
Smoking increases a person’s chances of getting an HPV infection.

Q: How does smoking increase your chances of getting an HPV infection?
A:
Smoking weakens the immune system and increases a person’ s vulnerability against infection. Nicotine and other gases in cigarette smoke are toxic and cause abnormal cells on the cervix. These atypical changes in the cervical cells are called dysplasia.

Q: How is the increased risk of developing cervical cancer in smokers related to the amount that they smoke?
A:
The increased risk is related to the number of cigarettes a person smokes as well as how long they have been smoking. Women who smoke and who have an HPV infections are at significantly increased risk of developing cervical cancer compared to women who do not smoke who have an HPV infection.