OROPHARYNGEAL CANCERS

hpv-kling2ALAN KLING, M.D

Dr. Kling is a recognized expert in the field of HPV treatment, Dr. Kling has lectured on HPV at Columbia, Cornell, Mount Sinai, NYU, Yale and many other medical centers, as well as at numerous national meetings. He is up-to-date on the latest advances in the diagnosis and treatment of HPV. Dr. Kling is the recognized go-to-person for HPV-related diagnoses in the metropolitan NYC area.
Dr. Kling’s private practice offices are located on the Upper East Side in Manhattan and in Park Slope, Brooklyn. The offices are comfortable, stylish, elegantly decorated and impeccably clean. You can feel reassured that your consultation and treatment will be performed by an accomplished, experienced, and well-respected board-certified physician.

Q: What are oropharyngeal cancers?
A: Oropharyngeal cancers include cancers in the tonsils, the base of the tongue, the palate and the back of the throat.

Q: Can HPV infections cause cancers in the mouth and throat?
A: HPV is now known to cause a large number of cases of oropharyngeal cancers.

Q: What percentage of oropharyngeal cancers are caused by HPV?
A: 50% – 70% of cancers of the oropharynx are caused by HPV.

Q: What are the causes for those cases of oropharyngeal cancer not due to HPV?
A: The non-HPV related oropharyngeal cancers are seen more frequently in older men and are associated with tobacco and alcohol use.

Q: Is the frequency of oropharyngeal cancer increasing?
A: The frequency of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States is rising. The majority of these new cases are HPV-related and are occurring in nonsmokers.

Q: Which strains of HPV have been associated with oropharyngeal cancers?
A: Oropharyngeal cancers are most frequently associated with the 16/18 high risk strains. HPV 16 is the most common strain associated with oropharyngeal cancers. The incidence of these cancers has been steadily climbing over the last several decades.

Q: Why has there been such a large increase in oropharyngeal cancers?
A: The large increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancers has been attributed to increased oral sex. The lining in the oropharyngeal cavity is a hospitable reservoir for the HPV infection.

Q: Are men or women more likely to develop oropharyngeal cancer?
A: Men are several times more likely to develop oropharyngeal cancers then women. Men also develop a more aggressive form of the cancer. Oropharyngeal cacners are increasing in frequency in both en and women but are increasing in frequency at a much higher rate in men.

Q: How much more frequent are oropharyngeal cancers in men compared to women?
A: The rate of increase of oropharyngeal cancers is 11x greater in men compared to women.

Q: What is the relationship between HPV and oropharyngeal cancers?
A: Up to 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are caused by HPV, and this number is steadily increasing.

Q: Were HPV infections always the main cause of oropharyngeal cancers?
A: HPV infections used to be associated with oropharyngeal cancers in only 30% of the cases, but the percentage of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer has risen dramatically over the last several years.

Q: Why has there been such a dramatic increase in cancers of the oral cavity caused by HPV?
A: The increase in oropharyngeal cancers is believed to be associated with the increased frequency of oral sex.

Q: How much more frequent are cancers of the oral cavity in men compared to women?
A: The rate of increase of oropharyngeal cancers is 11x greater in men compared to women.

Q: How does the incidence of oral cancers in men compare to the incidence of cervical cancer in women?
A: The incidence of HPV-cause oropharyngeal cancers in men is now greater than the incidence of cervical cancer in women.

Q: How common are oropharyngeal cancers?
A: The incidence of oropharyngeal cancers is increasing in both women and men, but at an appreciably faster rate in men.

Q: Would the HPV vaccine be helpful in protecting against oropharyngeal cancer?
A: The results of the HPV vaccine in protecting women against cervical cancer indicates that it holds promise to help oropharyngeal cancer caused by the same high risk strains that cause cervical cancer.

Q: How common are oropharyngeal cancers compared to cervical cancers in the United States?
A: Although the HPV vaccine was initiated researched and marketed for women as a protection against cervical cancer, the number of new cases of cancer of the oropharynx now exceeds the number of new cases of cervical cancer.

Q: Why did the number of cases of cervical cancers in the United States decrease so dramatically?
A: The screening tests in the United States and other developed countries have been extremely effective in preventing cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is unfortunately an extremely common disease in developing countries .

Q: How effective are the diagnostic and preventive methods against oropharyngeal cancer?
A: The diagnostic and preventive methods currently in use for oropharyngeal cancer are limited. This is an additional reason why the HPV vaccine for both women and men would be valuable in preventing infection and disease.

Q: What is the effectiveness of the HPV vaccine against oropharyngeal cancers?
A: The effectiveness of the HPV vaccine against oropharyngeal cancers is being studied. The HPV vaccine would be expected to have a protective effective against oropharyngeal cancers caused by the same high risk strains that have been demonstrated to effectively decrease the incidence of pre-cancerous cervical lesions in women.